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The Green Anaconda of South America!

The Green Anaconda of South America!

The green anaconda, also known as the common anaconda and water boa, is a non-venomous boa species native to South America. There are many species of this reptile, but the most common of these is the green anaconda.

The green anaconda can reach 17.1 ft long. More typical mature specimens reportedly can range up to 16.4 ft, with the females, at around a mean length of 15.1 ft, being much larger in adulthood than the male. Weights are less well studied, though will reportedly range from 66 to 154 lb in an average range adult.

Green anacondas are the heaviest, and largest, type of snake in the world, but only the second longest (the longest type of snake is the reticulated python).

They are hunted by men for their expensive skin as the demand of anaconda skin is very high in the fashion industry.

Pygmy Marmoset, the smallest monkey in the world!

Pygmy Marmoset, the smallest monkey in the world!

The pygmy marmoset is a small New World monkey native to rainforests of the western Amazon Basin in South America. It is famous for being the smallest monkey and one of the smallest primates in the world at just over 3.5 oz. It is commonly found in evergreen and river edge forests and is a gum-feeding specialist.

Most of the pygmy marmoset population live in stable troops of two to nine individuals that includes a dominant male, a breeding female, and up to four successive litters of offspring. They communicate using a complex system including vocal, chemical, and visual signals. The female gives birth to twins twice a year and the parental care is shared among the group.

White-eared jacamar

White-eared jacamar

The White-eared Jacamar is the geographically more widespread of the two species that comprise the genus Galbalcyrhynchus, which is restricted to western Amazonia. The other species, the Purus Jacamar (Galbalcyrhynchus purusianus), substitutes the White-eared Jacamar to the south of its range. As its name suggests, the White-eared Jacamar’s most striking plumage feature is the conspicuous white ear coverts patch, which instantly distinguishes the present species from its only congeneric. Both species are otherwise chunky-bodied, broad-winged, and short-tailed jacamars, with overall reddish-chestnut plumage.

The White-eared Jacamar ranges from southern Colombia south to northeast Peru and east through western Brazil, at least as far as the confluence of the Rio Solimões with the Rio Purus. It inhabits lowland primary forest, both on land and seasonally flooded areas. It is usually easily seen due to its liking for clearings and other semi-open areas, often beside rivers and streams.